Echelon Stride Review

Justin Mastine-Frost | Last Updated - Nov 9, 2020
Editor's Rating: 7 /10

This Treadmill Could Be For You If:

  • You are motivated by leaderboards and video-based interactive coaching
  • Have limited space in which to work out at home
  • Are already a follower/user of Echelon Fit Connect programming on other equipment

We knew this was coming, and it has finally arrived. Meet the Echelon Stride—the brand’s first entry into the treadmill space, and one that leverages the same qualities and values as the brand’s line of indoor cycles, rowing machines, and video workout mirrors. Looking at this unit, there’s a lot to consider. On one hand, its clever folding design is much more compact than most other treadmills on the market right now, giving it an upper hand for folks in smaller spaces. On the other hand, Smaller rollers, a less powerful motor, lack of built-in touchscreen, and and a smaller running track compared to competitors like the NordicTrack Commercial 1750 mean that this unit makes some serious compromises as a trade for its portability and stowing capability.

 

Now some of you might be saying this comparison isn’t fair, as the Echelon Stride is priced at $1,338.99 and the NordicTrack is $1,799, but those listed prices aren’t as clear as you’d make them out to be. First of all, the NordicTrack 1750 comes with a year if iFit Membership, which is their version of a streaming training service. To get the Echelon stride with a year’s membership (prepaid), you have to tack on the $399.99 annual membership, making the Echelon Stride $1738.98—basically on par with the NordicTrack. With that consideration in mind we have to say that the value proposition isn’t great here.

 

That said, the Echelon Stride is very much the type of unit that’s perfectly suited to a very specific demographic. Being smaller and easier to tuck away than the NordicTrack is a big selling feature for the urban apartment dweller, there’s no question there. Up against a wall, the unit will only take up a 10-inch by roughly 2-foot footprint in your space. it can also tuck under your bed so long as you have about 10 or 11 inches of clearance to slide it under. This cannot be said for its competition. With those considerations, one does have to consider how frequently they intend to use their machines, and how motivated they will be. It’s easy to fall into that ‘out of sight, out of mind’ trap, meaning that once the treadmill is hidden it becomes easier to ignore.

 

What We Like:

  • Echelon’s Engaging Programming: Echelon has found fans in the market by hiring quality trainers and delivering solid training sessions that keep you going even when you’re reaching exhaustion.
  • Compact Size: On one hand a smaller treadmill isn’t always a good thing, but we don’t all have sprawling workout rooms either. The Echelon Stride packs away nicely, and makes living with a treadmill in a smaller apartment or home much more tolerable.
  • Easy-Fold Design: Most brands with folding treadmills do their best to make the system simple and painless, and the same can be said for echelon. The console folds down, then the arms, and then the whole unit (which only weighs 156 pounds) can be tipped upright, taking up a very modest 10-inch depth of footprint. Lean it against a wall, tuck it into a closet, or slide it under the bed—it’s that easy.

Echelon Stride Treadmill - Key Specs:

Star Rating:3.5-stars
Motor:1.75 HP
Incline:0 to 10%
Running Area:20" x 55"
Folding:Yes
Top Speed:12 MPH
Weight Capacity:300 LBS
Dimensions:n/a" L x n/a" W x n/a" H
Built-In Programs:Interactive

What We Don’t Like:

  • Price vs. Features: Ignoring the compact-fold function for a moment, this is a steeply priced treadmill whose specs don’t live up to the competition. Its incline only goes to 10% rather than the standard 15, its motor horsepower is low (1.75hp), and its running deck is more compact than the majority of its competitors.
  • Short Warranty: With only 2 years on parts and electronics, the warranty on the Commercial 1750 is shorter than that of its key competitors.

Our Verdict:

This is yet another treadmill that’s tough to score, in that it’s great for a small segment of the market, but not up to par when you look at the big picture. It’s now a top contender as far as compact and stowable treadmills go, but it’s way down the list as far as the general market in the $1,200 – $2,000 treadmill segment goes.